About

Justė Janulytė - D. Matvejev D. Matvejev

Born in Vilnius, Justė Janulytė studied composition at the Lithuanian Music and Theatre Academy, Milan ‘Giuseppe Verdi’ Conservatoire and in various masterclasses. She has collaborated with some of the world’s leading ensembles and soloists including Konzerthausorchester Berlin, WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln, Teatro La Fenice Symphony, Gothenburg Opera Symphony, BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Polish National Philharmonic Orchestra, Brno Philharmonic, French Flute Orchestra, Riga Sinfonietta, Birmingham Contemporary Music Group, The Swedish Radio choir, Estonian Philharmonic Chamber and Male Choirs, Danish Radio Chamber, SWR Vokalensemble and Camerata Silesia choirs, QuasarXasax and Flotilla saxophone quartets, cellists Sèverine Ballon, Henri Demarquette, Francesco Dillon, and Anton Lukoszevieze, flutist Manuel Zurria, saxophonist Marcus Weiss, harpsichordist Goska Isphording amongst others. Her music has been performed across Europe, the Americas, and Australia, and has featured in such contexts as Sydney Festival, Schleswig-Holstein Festival, Venice Biennale, RomaEuropa, Holland Festival, Warsaw Autumn, Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, SonicA (Glasgow), Maerzmusik (Berlin), Biennale Némo (Gaîté lyrique, Paris), Musica festival (Strasbourg), Musik protokoll im steirischem Herbst (Graz), Musicadhoy (Madrid), Vale of Glamorgan Festival (Cardiff), Expositions of New Music, Moravian Autumn (Brno), Wittener Tage für neue Kammermusik (Witten), Gaida (Vilnius) to name a few.

The majority of the works by the author, written for dense monochromatic ensembles (only strings, only winds or only voices), explore musical time/space perception through large-scale multilayered textures and extremely gradual metamorphoses. While balancing between the aesthetics of minimalism, spectralism and drone music, Justė Janulytė composes acoustic metaphors of optic ideas (Observation of Clouds for voices, winds and strings, The Colour of Water for saxophone(s) solo and orchestraand Here at the quiet limit for male choir and string orchestra), and researches the visual nature of musical phenomena in the works where sound and image are fused together (Breathing Music for string quartet, electronics and kinetic sculptures, Eclipses for 4 strings, live electronics and soundproof glass installation, Sandglasses for 4 cellos, electronics and video scenography).

In 2009 Janulyte won the International Rostrum of Composers in Paris (in the category of composers under 30). In 2011 the composer was awarded the Young Artist's Prize by the Lithuanian Ministry of Culture and in 2017 the Lithuanian National Arts and Culture Prize, the highest artistic distinction in Lithuania. In 2019 she won the ‘Musica femina München’ competition.

In 2020 Juste Janulyte made her cinematic debut collaborating with Latvian director Viesturs Kairišs on the full length feature "City on the River"

Justė Janulytė currently teaches composition at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre, lives between Vilnius and Milan.

Some recordings at: https://soundcloud.com/juste-janulyte

List of works and performances

 

Janulyte has been hailed one of Europe’s most prodigious young composers. Her award-winning music typically features only one type of instrument, producing long, slow, gradual transformations in texture and register. This unique approach sucks time into itself, making it feel both flitting and eternal. Hellen Wright   

In the music of Justė Janulytė the sound unfolds as an autonomous event, with incredible lightness, as a confluence of energies, which transform it into increasingly dilated harmonies. No beat, no apparent rhythm, just the ‘deaf’ pulsation perhaps, a downtempo, as some kinds of the electronic music are qualified; the swelling of intensities, the saturation of space, and then eventual return to the state of calm, which is already different, marked and disturbed. The importance of material that found reflection in the titles of her works: Textile (for orchestra, 2006), Aquarelle (for choir, 2007), Silence of the Falling Snow (for two pianos, 2006), Endings (for 4 saxophones, 2005)... But the most important is metamorphosis, a very personal one and therefore instantly recognisable. This is not the telluric forces in Xenakis, or the atomic process in Ligeti, but rather an irradiant form. Elongation of Nights, the second score for string orchestra after the White Music, with which the composer made her public debut in 2004, gives a good example of such radiation. Some kind of timeless, floating metamorphosis. A strikingly innovative dramaturgy of sound. Antoine Gind  

The composer's way of thinking is easily recognizable when listening to "Sandglasses": long, slow expositions; gradual enrichment of texture; thanks to her relished canon technique large sound layers create impression of twinkling. All of it inspires images of lights, colors glimmering and rippling. It seems the music emerges from unseen distances, and gets closer to the listener without notice, then finally pierces into the listener, passes through all the cells, moves the atoms, and then slowly recedes until disappearing completely in the horizon. Sometimes it seems that Juste’s works do not have a beginning or an end and that over there, behind the horizon, the music keeps on moving, pierces someone else. I associate Juste's music not with sound images but with the substance which is moving in space and has its temperature, light and density. Such substance-like quality of music is effective to the listener: even when hearing the piece for the first time you can identify in which partition of the piece you are, where to is the mass of sound moving. This quasi-physical contact is in my opinion an essential feature of the reception of Juste’s music. Jūratė Katinaitė

 

 

Janulyte has been hailed one of Europe’s most prodigious young composers. Her award-winning music typically features only one type of instrument, producing long, slow, gradual transformations in texture and register. This unique approach sucks time into itself, making it feel both flitting and eternal. Hellen Wright | The Skinny
Janulyte has been hailed one of Europe’s most prodigious young composers. Her award-winning music typically features only one type of instrument, producing long, slow, gradual transformations in texture and register. This unique approach sucks time into itself, making it feel both flitting and eternal. Hellen Wright | The Skinny